Jonathan Fleming's Blog

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Posts Tagged ‘tych panel

Tych Panel 2: Creating Image Layouts Just Got More Awesome

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I’ve been using the first version of Tych Panel to create all of the custom image layouts I display here on my blog, and it has been such a huge time saver for me. So I was thrilled to get an email today from the developer, Reimund Trost, letting me know that he has finally released Tych Panel 2, an extensive update to the Photoshop CS5 extension I’ve come to love so much.

Tych Panel 2 has a ton of new features and enhancements, starting with a brand new compositing algorithm that lets you add both rows and columns, which means you can be much more creative with your layouts than ever before. It also gives you the ability to reorder images as you compose your ntych (a feature you’ll love if you’ve been using the first version), the ability to maintain a custom width and height as you add pictures (very helpful in blogging applications), integration with Adobe Bridge, smart objects and layer masks (you can re-crop your panels even after they’ve been laid out!), actions, and even more output options.

You can also play with background color, outer borders, and even have the extension automatically create rounded corners for you. I had a little fun with this today using some images from my first post about Tych Panel.

(Yes I know, wonderfully random to end this string of images with a goofy picture of Suki)

Reimund has put together a great video explaining how to make the most out of Tych Panel 2, so check it out and download the new extension at http://lumens.se/tychpanel/

It’s free. What are you waiting for? =)

Written by Jonathan

March 25, 2012 at 10:04 pm

Suki…Unleashed!

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Fuji X100 | 1/200 sec, f/2.8, ISO 200

Such a historic day for Suki, and as you can see, she’s quite happy about it. Today we granted her the most off-leash freedom she has ever had. There’s no better place in the city to do this than at Fort Funston, an old military outpost located at the south end of San Francisco’s Ocean Beach. The area is full of wide open space, sand dunes, trails, and of course, there’s the beach.

When Suki was younger we let her off leash at this same park, and quickly regretted the decision as she bolted off into the horizon with no regard for her pack (her comparatively slow-moving human parents). Most Shiba owners have at least one Shiba-bolting horror story to tell….I have like…20. In fact, I took my opening photo of my 52 weeks project at this location. Check out the image here. See the leash? Yeah, I totally didn’t trust her back then.

But while I’d still never ever let her off leash on a city street (it’s not legal anyway in SF), I’ve come to trust the bond Suki and I have built over the years. She definitely knows we belong to each other, and while Bridget was feeling a little hesitant today, I knew that Suki wouldn’t ditch us this time.

So, at peace with the entire concept, we stepped out onto the ice plant and set her free:


Fuji X100 | 1/80 sec, f/2.2, ISO 200

The image above represents a very memorable moment for me. She actually bolted ahead of us, turned the corner and disappeared. Before I could even call out to her, she reappeared just as you see her above. That’s right. A Shiba Inu waiting up and making sure her humans are following….for reals?!?!

From that point forward, it was all smooth sailing:


Fuji X100 | 1/280 sec, f/4.5, ISO 800


Fuji X100 | 1/280 sec, f/5, ISO 800

Suki is definitely the recon member of our family, scouting ahead from time to time but never forgetting to pull back and let us catch up, even stopping when we stop:


Fuji X100 | 1/340 sec, f/5, ISO 800


Fuji X100 | 1/850 sec, f/2, ISO 400

Thrilled with the entire situation, we continued onto a trail from the dunes down to the beach. At this point Suki had burned off a significant amount of energy, and now more relaxed, stuck even closer to us:


Fuji X100 | 1/950 sec, f/2, ISO 400

Unlike the puppy Suki of old, today’s Suki won’t chase absolutely anything that runs (above).


Fuji X100 | 1/340 sec, f/5, ISO 400

A simple “let’s go, Suki,” and she snaps away from what ever she’s doing and follows. If I didn’t have these photos I’d swear none of this was real, just an awesome dream.

The following are a few of the images I took at the beach, processed into black and white in post:

When we were done at the beach, it was a long climb back up the cliff. We took the stairs, and Suki…well, eventually got on the stairs, but not before breaking a few rules. In the image below, she’s looking at me as I yell out “hey silly, you do NOT qualify as wild life! Get back on the stairs!”


Fuji X100 | 1/320 sec, f/5, ISO 800 (flash on)

Such a beautiful area to bring the dog, and such an exciting day for Team Suki!

One side note: I’m getting a lot of questions and emails about what picture settings I use when I shoot with my Fuji X100. I’ll go ahead and answer that question here once and for all. I’ve mentioned this before, but for most of my recent blog posts that involve shooting simple snaps and documenting life etc, I find it easier to work with the JPEG files from the camera than to shoot everything in RAW. So when I’m not shooting RAW, I use these picture settings:

Film Sim: Astia
Dynamic Range: Auto
Color: High
Sharpness: Hard
Highlight Tone: M-Hard
Shadow Tone: M-Hard
Noise Reduction: M-Low
White Balance: Auto
WB Shift: +2 Red, -2 Yellow

I make slight curve adjustments in post to my taste, and that’s it. Depending on the situation, I sometimes use the Provia film simulation as well. The other question I get a lot is “does the X100 produce great JPEGs?”

YES.


Fuji X100 | 1/420 sec, f/2.8, ISO 200

I’m proud of you Suki. Today you have proven yourself off leash. =)

Food Trucks and Pink Peonies

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Nikon D700 + Nikkor AFS 35mm f/1.4G | 1/4,000 sec, f/2, ISO 400

Off the Grid is awesome for two reasons: great food, and Suki is allowed. The large, 30 food truck Off The Grid Market is held every Friday night at Fort Mason here in San Francisco. It was windy and drizzle fell on us the whole time, but oh well. Let’s eat!


Nikon D700 + Nikkor AFS 35mm f/1.4G | 1/2,000 sec, f/1.4, ISO 800

Bridget and I had a very interesting dish: spicy curry chicken over sweet potato waffle fries. Sort of reminded me of the Pork Fries at Broken Record. Great stuff. We also got to meet up with artist and blogger Karleen, along with her husband. We spent most of our time with our cameras pointed Shibaward:


Nikon D700 + Nikkor AFS 35mm f/1.4G | 1/1,600 sec, f/1.4, ISO 400

Suki had no issue doing “roll overs” and “shake paws” with her new friends. Impressive!

I’m sure you can see from the last three images that Suki is quite a tolerant Shiba!

I should probably mention that the images in this post are all processed in Lightroom 3 using Cara Rose’s “Suki” preset, a custom preset inspired by the artist’s first encounter with Suki. Cara was kind enough to send me the preset as a gift! The punchy contrast and warm glow it applies to my images was perfect for combating tonight’s dreary weather. The “Suki” is available as one of 12 custom-made presets in Cara’s San Francisco inspired preset package, which she sells here. Thank you, Cara!


Nikon D700 + Nikkor AFS 35mm f/1.4G | 1/2,000 sec, f/1.4, ISO 800

My little X100 stayed in the bag most of the evening, mainly due to all the drizzle. It still found its way into curious hands, however. Make sure to check out Karleen’s work at pinkpeonyphotography.blogspot.com.

Tych Panel: Making Diptychs, Triptychs, and More

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I follow many photo bloggers who arrange their images in beautiful multi-panel layouts on their blog posts. I love the look of multiple panels, so I started presenting my work in the same way here. Ever since I started doing it, however, I’ve been asked the same question many, many times:

“Hey Jonathan, how do you make these multi-panel thingys? Do you arrange them manually or do you use some kind of software?”

Here’s the secret:

When I first started arranging my photos into multiple panels, I did indeed make everything manually in Photoshop. What a pain! Now I use a third-party Photoshop CS5 extension called Tych Panel. As a Photoshop extension, it works right in CS5 as an additional panel that automates the diptych/triptych process. It’s so easy to use that I laughed the first time I gave it a try. How easy? Check out the video below to see what was involved in making the diptych at the top of this post (might want to view in full screen):

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Whew! Doesn’t get much simpler than that, does it? What about the triptych below?

Just open the files, chose the pattern you want, and Tych Panel does the rest:

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Ok, what if you want to get crazy and just keep adding photos to make one really big multi-tych? Can do!

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I know the videos moved a little fast and didn’t specifically outline the step by step directions for using Tych Panel. Have no fear! Reimund Trost, the developer of this amazing extension, has very detailed instructions on how to use Tych Panel on his website.

Oh, and I forgot to mention, Tych Panel is FREE. Head on over to the link below to download it and give it a try yourself:

http://lumens.se/tychpanel/

Hey fellow bloggers, how do you create your dips and trips?

Written by Jonathan

June 16, 2011 at 9:49 pm